Hot spring.

alas poor yorick   I KNEW HIM WELL

Today Gabe is wearing a yellow t-shirt, blue shorts, and brown flip flops.

“Can I ask you a serious question?”

“Okay, sure.”

I was staring at myself in the mirror. I asked myself if I could ask myself a question, and I agreed.

“…What is going on with your hair?”

I didn’t have an answer.

One of the terrible downfalls of working from home is that is it unbelievably easy to go through your day looking like the worst version of yourself, knowing full well that you look like the worst version of yourself, and not finding that alone a good enough reason to stop looking like the worst version of yourself.

This week, though, I had a revelation: it is not a waste to do your hair if you work from home. It is not a waste to put on make up and braid your hair and wear your favorite pants just because you work from home and aren’t likely to interact with anyone terribly important in person that day.

Even if no one sees you and appreciates how great you look, it’s not a waste to treat yourself like you are an important enough person to get dressed up for. It’s actually kind of nice!

So this week I gave myself a manicure (because seriously these hippies have no place where I can get my nails done), did my hair every day, got dressed in my favorite clothes every day (I mean, different ones — not the same favorite outfit every day, which is just as bad and also weirder than just wearing running shorts and a tank top every day), and put on make up every day.

And you guys, it was great. I can’t say I was more productive, but I can say I was happier.

Which is weird, right?

Maybe it’s not that weird. I’ve started exercising every day this summer, without really meaning to, it just kind of happened, and I can say that definitely makes me feel better even though none of it seems that significant. I mean, I’m not training for anything — there’s no real *reason* for doing it — but it makes me feel good to do.

(Clearly I have a problem with doing things that aren’t specifically for something.)

But I have to say, it was always kind of a fun surprise to catch myself in the mirror or go out to a coffee shop and think, “Hey I look great!” when I was wearing my real clothes every day. The novelty never wore off. It feels good to act like a better version of yourself, and to care about it. I guess it was just a great reminder that the clothes make the man (a little bit) and it’s actually worth it to look a little nice if you want to feel a little nice.

So that’s it. A great revelation, great pants, great hair. Just great great great.

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5 comments

  1. Don Royster

    I think it is especially important to get dressed for work if you work at home. For one thing, it separates your work hours from your home hours. Another is that I think it increases your confidence level. Oh, and Gabe is looking so gaebernoir.

    • Kate Stull

      Totally! I didn’t realize what a difference it made, but it breaks up the day and makes changing into pajamas feel so much better (as opposed to changing from running shorts to pajama shorts, which is much less monumental). Also I am a big fan of Gabe’s look today as well. 🙂

  2. bernadetteyoungquist

    I completely agree! I’ve often found myself in a pattern of going right to my studio with coffee in the morning and before I know it, it is noon and I haven’t even brushed my teeth and it makes me feel terrible! I make a concerted effort to give myself the first hour for self care and then I feel ready for the whole day;)

    • Kate Stull

      Oof — I know that “oops I just worked for four hours in my pajamas” feeling well and it is not pleasant. I had to start leaving my computer out of my room at night so I wouldn’t wake up, check my email first thing in the morning, and then still be sitting on my bed working an hour later — that morning routine and taking a moment for yourself is key! I’m glad I’m not the only one who struggles with remembering to keep it up, but it sounds like we are both on the right track. 🙂

  3. Pingback: Role modal. | kate stull

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